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Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"טבלה רגילה"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} I will start my post by quoting Garner Group's Magic Quadrant for Application Infrastructure for Back-End Application Integration Projects 2Q07 first Caution on Sun Microsystems: "Sun's sales force was ill-prepared for the SeeBeyond acquisition, which significantly hurt SeeBeyond's momentum. The sales force has been trained, but Sun must rebuild momentum in a market where ... (more)

Running Fedora 17 Under Windows 7

The advantages of virtualization are obvious for almost everyone. One of the first influential articles on the subject was my article [1] which was of interest to more than 48,000 readers. Below you will find useful and quick methodology on how to install and use Fedora 17 under the Windows 7 environment to gain efficiency and productivity in a cost-effective and convenient way. Only free tools will be used. PC used for this article has 6 GB of RAM and Intel core i7 CPU. The PC runs under 64-bit Windows 7 and has 680 Gb HDD. This is a typical PC configuration at the time of writing, so most of the readers have a PC with similar or better parameters and that's why the technology described above will be useful "out-of-the-box" without any additional investments. To mention the last but not the least pre-condition, it will be useful to have JDK 1.7 (from update 5 and u... (more)

Sun Microsystems Launches GlassFish Enterprise Server v3

Download GlassFish Portfolio Whitepaper Sun Microsystems and the GlassFish community announced the immediate availability of Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server v3, the latest release of Sun's commercial Java Platform Enterprise Edition (Java EE) application server and its open source counterpart, GlassFish v3. Click Here to View GlassFish 3.0 Webinar Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server v3 provides customers with an enterprise grade, open source based application server solution focused on reducing application and deployment complexity. Click here to to leverage the AMP/SAMP stack with your existing GlassFish Enterprise Server deployments in your organization. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server v3 is the industry’s first application server to support the new Java Platform Enterprise Edition 6 (Java EE 6). Java EE 6 introduces features to increase the flexibility of the platform... (more)

Eclipse Special: Remote Debugging Tomcat & JBoss Apps with Eclipse

To view our full selection of recent Eclipse stories click here Over the last several weeks I've received a few questions about remote debugging with Eclipse. I posted about this on my other blog back in February here but with not enough info for others to follow. If you go look at that blog entry you will see that I looked into 'in eclipse' debugging but did not find it satisfactory. So without further ado here is how I use Tomcat, JBoss, and Eclipse to build and debug applications. Whichever platform you are using (Tomcat or JBoss) you need to start them with the JPDA debugging enabled. For Tomcat this is very easy. In the $CATALINA_HOME/bin directory there is a script catalina.sh. If you provide the arguments 'jpda start' tomcat will startup and listen on port 8000 for a debugger connection. With JBoss its only slightly more complicated. Basically you need to speci... (more)

JBoss CEO Marc Fleury Discusses Open Source

"I don't have to work anymore," said Dr. Marc Fleury in an amusing aside during a recent interview with SYS-CON.TV, from his office in the Buckhead section of Atlanta. He was referring to how his role as CEO is changing from start-up entrepreneur to manager of a more mature company, as JBoss continues to grow and experience new levels of success. Whereas in the early days he "wrote tons and tons of code," today he is more focused on the organizational and customer-related challenges common to any fast-growing company. Fleury says his company is taking square aim at IBM WebSphere and BEA WebLogic, with a current staff of 150 people and a commitment to customer service. "We don't make any money on license revenue, of course, so customer service is everything to us," he told SYS-CON in remarks before the camera started rolling. During the interview, he outlined the way h... (more)

SOA World Conference & Expo SYS-CON.TV Power Panel Live From Times Square

View "SOA World Conference & Expo" Power Panel Executives from IBM, BEA, JBoss, Microsoft, Oracle, and Sun debated diverse aspects of their application server offerings. A discussion of price points, from the JBoss open-source model which emphasizes service revenues, to the more traditional business models from most of the other vendors was followed by a discussion of the technical merits of each platform and how each company is uniquely striving to serve what it perceives as its customers' needs. The six industry experts involved in the Shoot-Out this year were Mark Heid (IBM), Gary McBride (BEA),  Shaun Connolly (JBoss), Dino Chiesa (Microsoft), Mike Lehmann (Oracle), and Rich Sharples (Sun). The panel predictably discussed open source, but in ways that might have been unexpected.  One of the more interesting discussion points, posed by Yakov Fain, for example, invol... (more)

BEA and JBoss Blogs Stir SCA Open Source Debate

IBM, BEA, and SAP are spearheading a new specification known as the Service Connector Architectecture, or SCA, designed, according to IBM, to "describe a set of specifications which describe a model for building applications and systems using a Service-Oriented Architecture." According to IBM, "SCA extends and complements prior approaches to implementing services, and SCA builds on open standards such as Web services." IONA, Oracle, Siebel Systems (which recently agreed to be acquired by Oracle),  and Sybase are also part of the push behind SCA. On the other hand, JBoss is not. BEA executive Bill Roth (pictured) recently wrote a lengthy piece in his blog in support of SCA, while JBoss CEO Marc Fleury recently wrote at length about why SCA is a bad thing in his blog. According to Roth: "SCA is a specification that allows developers to focus on writing business logic. M... (more)

SOA Pattern of the Week (#3): Domain Inventory

Enterprise-wide harmonization is a desirable and ideal target state that fully supports pretty much everything SOA and service-orientation stand for. For those that have achieved such a state, bless your standardized hearts. You have accomplished something that has eluded many others. However, not attaining this state does not mean you cannot successfully adopt SOA. In some circles it has become common to view an SOA initiative as an all-or-nothing proposition that demands an uncompromising commitment to an enterprise-wide transformation effort. For those that subscribe to this view, it can inspire visions of architects choking at the thought of having to comply to global data models, IT managers losing sleep over having to give up authority over their departments, and rebellious developers being rounded up by the standards police (equipped with industry-standard rio... (more)

Red Hat Buys Makara for PaaS

Red Hat said Tuesday that it's bought Makara, a Redwood City, California start-up barely out of beta whose widgetry leverages the virtual layer and lets users deploy, manage, monitor and scale their Java and PHP applications on both private and public clouds like Amazon and VMware fluffery. Terms were not disclosed. It was rumored the pair had been talking. Makara was backed by Shasta Ventures, Sierra Ventures, Marc Andreessen and Ben Horowitz to the tune of at least $6 million. Once integrated with Red Hat's JBoss Enterprise Middleware infrastructure, Makara's complexity-masking self-service, self-managing Cloud Application Platform is supposed to make Red Hat's existing Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solution more comprehensive and flexible, touted as the easiest, cheapest on-ramp to the cloud. How long integration will take is unclear. Makara is said to be good at... (more)

The Attack of Oracle Guest

Last October I published a post that identified the features that both JBoss Data Grid and Oracle Coherence provide (link). My goal was to establish a baseline for the features that a data grid should provide. It was not to state that one data grid was better than the other. Little did I know an Oracle employee would respond by attacking Red Hat, its engineers, and myself. It is fear? Is it hostility? I don’t know. I have engaged in discussions with competitors before. Roman and I engaged in a competitive discussion in response to one of my posts comparing IBM WebSphere and JBoss EAP (link). However, we both conducted ourselves in a professional manner. I’ve engaged in competitive discussions with Spring evangelists, but we focused on the technology. I always enjoy reading the discussions between Cameron, Nikita, and Nati on the TheServerSide. I find their discussi... (more)

Open Source in the Cloud - How Much Should You Care?

In his opening keynote for Red Hat Summit, Jim Whitehurst, the CEO of Red Hat asked the audience: "Name an innovation that isn't happening in Open Source - other than Azure!" I can certainly add iPhone and AWS to the mix but let me stick to the cloud topic with the following question: "How much Open Source matters in the cloud?" Let's first elaborate on a two misconceptions about Open Source. Open Source Is Free Not really! In the cloud doesn't matter whether you are running on an Open Source platform or not - it is NOT free because you pay for the service. And for long Open Source project have been funded through the services premiums that you pay. I would argue that Open Source vendors have mastered the way they can take profit from Open Source services and are far ahead than the proprietary vendors. The whole catch here is that you pay nothing for the software a... (more)